Big Tree

The Big Tree is thought to be one of the largest examples of the species in Victoria.

It has been recorded as having a height of 30m, a canopy spread of 34m, and a trunk circumference of 9.35m.

Estimates of the age of the tree range between 500 – 1,000 years.

It is listed as a tree of State significance on the National Trust’s Register of Significant Trees of Victoria for itsĀ “outstanding size, curious fusion of branches, as an outstanding example of the species and as an important landmark.”

The National Trust regards its conservation as vital to the local community and the state as a whole. Already an ancient giant when the first white settlers arrived in the 1840s, the Big Tree has played an important part in the cultural and social life of the Guildford community. This wonderful tree survives as an important symbol and a link between our community and its traditional owners, the Dja Dja Wurrung people.

Already an ancient giant when the first white settlers arrived in the 1840s, the Big Tree has played an important part in the cultural and social life of the Guildford community. This wonderful tree survives as an important symbol and a link between our community and its traditional owners, the Dja Dja Wurrung Aboriginal people.

Due to its great age, numerous hollows have formed within the tree providing habitat for many creatures. This tree is an eco-system which sustains a vast range of bird and animal life including magpies, rosellas, lorikeets, parrots, kookaburras, wood ducks, boobook owls, honey eaters and numerous species of insects, native bees and possums.

Potential damage to the Big Tree has been avoided in recent times due to the actions of the local community. In 1990, two roads that crossed directly beneath the tree canopy causing soil compaction were re-routed. In 1991, extensive branch pruning was avoided by relocating existing powerlines.
Sources: Frank Passalaqua(dec), Tony Holland, Ian Huxley, National Trust (Victoria), Vic Roads, Shire of Newstead Heritage Study

Disaster Strikes!

On Saturday evening, February 28th 2015, just as dusk was falling, Guildford was hit hard by tornado-like winds, felling the big cottonwood tree down by the river, and tearing limbs from the iconic Big Tree, reducing it by an estimated one third. The debris has been cleared since then and the tree seems to have survived its ordeal, though its size is certainly diminished.

style, the CFA, Powercor and various builders, carpenters and electricians were on the job almost immediately. We thank them for the hours they put in to help restore Guildford and surrounding areas.

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